My Comments

November 15, 2008 annwill

THIS POSTING INDICATES “MY COMMENTS” AND SOME FOLLOW UP RESPONSES TO POSTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LEARNING PROCESS AS I AND MY FELLOW STUDENTS HAVE COMMUNICATED OVER THE PERIOD OF THIS COURSE.

What is RSS by alrosa

MY COMMENTS:

You said 1 month ago:

I learned a bit more about RSS after reading your blog post. After taking a look at http://www.faganfinder.com it appears that RSS is not really complicated. This site also indicates that the acronym can have a variation on the names. To name a few according to this site, there is “Really Simple Syndication, Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or a variation on one of those.” While there are different versions, most RSS feeds have no problem from one version to another. One particular point to note is that there is a similar and improved format quite like RSS called Atom. There are advantages and disadvantages to using Atom, but the major difference is that for Atom, “it is also able to carry more complex information, and it is consistent across the syndication, storage, and editing of information.” This site notes that most everything applicable to RSS on their web pages are applicable also to Atom, but notes that to learn more about what is specific to Atom go to http://www.atomenabled.org.

Reply to thread »



Don’t Be Nasty On The Net! Use Netiquitte!! by scoutmstr25

MY COMMENTS:

  You said 1 month ago:

I visited http://www.livinginternet.com and learned that every once in a while there seems to be a surge of people on Usenet correcting each other and tearing apart spelling and grammatical errors. This type of use of the internet is called the “spelling flame” and this site states that this is also a very poor, counterproductive use of the internet. It is further suggested that perhaps such mistakes be corrected privately through a single e-mail to the party who wrote the blog or article. Doing this privately prevents further irritation and shows a courtesy in discreteness, and does not bog down the internet with material that really becomes more cluttering in our lives. After all, we continue to have more and more junk mail in our lives, electronically and otherwise.

LA said 1 month ago:

I would consider that to be the case, as it would be polite not to endanger someone’s professional reputation by posting personal information about them where it is publicly accessible. Employers often google employees before interviews, so one has to be really careful about what information attached to their name appears on the internet. People have been denied jobs because of publicly accessible pictures of themselves appearing on sites such as Facebook.

Take the case of two girls from Yale Law School– they were attacked by anonymous individuals on a message board and subsequently sued, due to being denied employment on the basis of their names’ presence on that board in conjunction with lewd remarks. This may be an extreme example, but it is something people need to be aware of. A link to part of this story is here: http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/article/?id=2155

Reply to thread »



Install your own Home Network!! by scoutmstr25

MY COMMENTS:

You said 1 month ago:

I think the next most helpful piece of technology to acquire following the purchase of a wireless laptop is a wireless printer. After reading your post, it seems like the most common sense assumption to me now. I did some looking around to learn more about wireless printers at http://www.shopping.hp.com and I liked their slogan, “Live wirelessly. Print wirelessly.” The Officejet J6480 All-in-One printer can print up to 31 pages in black per minute and just slightly under that, 25 pages, for color. This machine will print, copy, scan and fax. One additional capability is the paper saving feature of automatically printing the output as two-sided documents. This unit is currently available for $169.99 after a $30.00 instant rebate and has been awarded the Editor’s Choice Award by PC Magazine while it also bears the Energy Star mark.

LA said 1 month ago:

Well, you don’t necessarily need a wireless printer in order for your entire network to be able to access printing. We have always just hooked a printer (ours is a small Canon Pixma IP1600, quite cheap but good enough for home use) to one of the regular desktop PC. After setting the printer as a shared printer via the Windows control panel, you are easily able to access the printer from any other computers on the network. A wireless printer is definitely a nice thing to have, but it’s not strictly necessary.

Reply to thread »



Computers in Emergency Vehicles by alrosa

 My Comments:

You said 1 month ago:

I think the flip side to quick emergency response through modern technology is a system such as Onstar which can indicate when and where an emergency such as a car accident or heart attack has occurred. At http://www.onstar.com I looked at some of the quick bullets about this great service now available due to advancements in technology. When an automobile is involved in a crash, sensors can give critical details to the response team on call. This is significant if you are unconscious or otherwise unable to give verbal details by mobile phone. I would like to mention some very fascinating facts I did not know about this type of system until I went to this website. A crash report comes up on the emergency response team’s screen which tells the status of the air bag, whether deployed or not. The maximum velocity (speed) at the time of the impact is indicated. Whether or not the vehicle has rolled over or had multiple impacts is indicated. Even the direction of the impact, such as front or rear, is indicated. This type of information is key to those on the way to assist with physical trauma as they race to grab emergency equipment and can determine ahead of time if other emergency service is needed, such as a medical helicopter for transport. Key elements are recorded in real-time details!

Reply to thread »



The Manifold Failings of Microsoft Vista by LA

My Comments:

You said 1 month ago:

It is amazing how harsh the CNET’s critique is of Windows Vista as a terrible top ten item. When I read from this site that it took six years of development but was instantly hated by computer experts, I would never have guessed they were talking about Windows Vista. Perhaps some of the problems are not as easily noticed by a basic user like me. I can say that I was very distracted at first by the new ribbon, but once I got familiar with that, all went much better. Of particular importance is the location of the office button, and I really frustrated myself until I learned that all of the key functions for basic document control are located there. I got my new Windows Vista last year when my system went down, and expanded to the upgraded software with a customized Dell package including more memory for gaming. This pleased my son as he was becoming so frustrated previously to the computer “freezing” in his military tactical games when using the previous Microsoft program. Because he spends so much time on the computer with the newer games and has constant keyboarding practice in his junior high keyboarding class, along with all the new popular software, the switch for him was like gravy!

tchrwannab2 said 1 month ago:

From all the reviews I have read on Vista, it’s not an operating system I want to pay money to upgrade to any time soon. I have had XP on my desktop and laptop computer for a few years now and am very content with it. I don’t have many problems at all. At work we are under an older version of Microsoft as well but I can’t recall which one. Working at a bank, I deal with banking programs not typical microsoft office programs. The only time I have used Windows Vista was at John Tyler when in the computer lab or library. Maybe the system is more user friendly than the review I have read and I’m pretty good on computers. I wonder how the ratings for the next operating system by Microsoft will play out.

Reply to thread »



Software by ddj8

My Comments:

You said 1 month ago:

I think it is fascinating that you have actually made software for both federal and state government employment applications. I have had very little programming experience; actually what I learned was years ago on the mainframe system at University of Richmond in a course called Basic Computer Programming. In reading your post I thought about how to get started in learning programming and I found a site that sounds very user friendly, http://programmingtips.com. Judah, the TipMaster, and president of ProgrammingTips.com indicates that her site is for everyone, from the professional programmer to the person just getting started who is a “non programmer.” This might be a helpful site, as she emphasizes that she encourages a lot of input from everyone, and wants this site to be a “software development resource.” I just wrote my recent post on the advantages of helping people through the internet with free sharing of technology information, so I was pleased to find this spot for tips. This “site includes articles, opinions, and links to other points of interest on the web” according to Judah. As one of your bookmarks, she suggests adding this site to gain expertise from connections and individuals that represent all levels of experience in computer programming. In adding a comment about distributing through online technology and easy access payments, I would think such resources are unequalled to other alternatives for someone quite busy like yourself where management is almost hands free exept for touching the keys on the keyboard!

krworks said 1 month ago:

First and foremost I must say that, as much as I enjoy learning about computer software, I can’t imagine ever actually producing any. I have a lot of respect for people who come up with software in general– but after reading your post and seeing everything else that goes behind distributing it, I think it’s even more amazing.

In response to your post, though, I believe that selling software online is the best way to get a loyal following. Everything is being marketed and sold directly over the internet nowadays. From musicians to authors, people are cutting out the middleman and selling directly to users–so why not computer software?

Reply to thread »



Storage and Security by rsjblog

My Comments:

You said 2 months ago:

The storage of data on smaller devices seems to call for some type of newer security. As you suggest, the smaller size of something like a thumb drive offers convenience, but also is a concern for loss or theft. Perhaps these could be tracked to rightful owners by a fingerprint technology or by coding some type of bar code that might imply “in case found–please log on to the following website and enter the code…” If such technology exists, I am not aware of it. There is certainly money to be made where the industry of information technology is a new field for newcomers to the world of theft.

Mike Reining said 2 months ago:

Security certainly is a tougher thing to maintain with the shrinking of data storage devices. There have been several USB drives lost by the British Ministry of Defense over the past few years. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/cornwall/7605923.stm) Also, there was at least one incident in the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs regarding the loss of a laptop loaded with veteran’s personal data.

I think this topic should be addressed on several levels at all establishments. The business I work for is very tight on security for product sensitivity reasons. Having a USB key dropped with all of our new products on it could be disastrous.

Robert Johnson said 2 months ago:

As part of the Risk Management department at my work, computer security is never something too far from my thoughts. One of the most important keys is to just be aware. Keep your laptop with you if you have to get up and go somewhere in the library. If you are at work, just lock the workstation when you get up. These simply things will easily thwart a criminal. If you use a thumb drive, make sure you don’t loose it or don’t put personal information on it. If you are paranoid, you can get one that is password protected and self destructs. Check out http://www.ironkey.com. Secondly, get a good virus and firewall package. McAfee sells one as does Symnatic and many others. You need more than just anti-virus software. Look for anti-spyware and a firewall. Next, change all of the default passwords for your devices. This is so important! Hijacking access through wireless is big business. In fact, there is a website where “they” are actively mapping wireless hot spots. You can actually put in your address and find out where unsecured routers exist near you. Check out http://www.wigle.net/.

To be honest, I don’t use wireless at home because you have to really know what you are doing. I also have a couple of USB drives on which I keep personal information, like budget, etc. I only access that information when I’m not attahed to the network. I never just leave my computer attached to the network (DSL). I always “disable” the network interface when I don’t need the Internet.

Reply to thread »



Hello World! by alrosa

My Comments:

You said 2 months ago:

In reviewing what you have indicated about the Environmental Protection Agency and that agency’s revelation on computer wastes, it is more than amazing how much solid waste we do create through modern technology. I did not know that there were so many things in a circuit board that were harmful if ingested. There are some charitable groups which are accepting ink cartridges for recycling, and proceeds are donated to animal rescue missions. This is something that I have learned about, encourage, and actively participate in at work. As far as the decision not to sign the Basel Convention, I think in the next presidential campaign, citizens should stress the importance of remedies to the hazardous waste problems of societies such as ours where the same technology that lends us our freedom carries with it the responsibility of reforming our world without the threat of these toxins. This is a nicely covered topic, and thanks also for the mention of recycling companies that offer to dispose of old technology hardware for free.

mnd103 said 2 months ago:

Thank you for bringing such insight regarding the issue of recycling of electronics such as the computer. I have been more familiar with the need to probably dispose of batteries, bulbs, and similar household products; but I was unaware of the transboundary movement of hazardous materials like computers; especially to LDCs (Least Developed Countries). Knowing that the relationship between human behavior, such as this, and its effect on natural hazards to cause major catastrophes ; I question why the United States signed into this international treaty (the “Basel Convention”) and have yet to ratify?

Reply to thread »



A Note on This Blog by LA

My Comments:

You said 2 months ago:

I am at https://annwill.wordpress.com and I like your design. Hopefully we will get to communicate quite a bit through class–I hope you will enjoy my blog! Thanks!

MY COMMENTS:

You said 2 months ago:

With prices at $250.00 for a rather substantial hard drive, it should be easier all the time for people to afford the new desktop computer you described. Noting that there is room in the case is particularly important for planning expansions. I got my new system with Windows Vista last year and I no longer hear my son complaining about any games freezing, or sluggish behavior with various functions. Still I am very interested in noting the CybertronPC Armor Gaming Personal Computer that you share in your post. This is because I am sure down the road the gaming for older teens with advanced computer skills will require knowledge of the best technology available, even if for comparison to products that are considered the “next best” for gaming. Thanks for sharing the tips, and also for the website suggestion of NewEgg.

Reply to thread »



About Shayla by shay23

MY COMMENTS

You said 2 months ago:

I used to sell Mary Kay Cosmetics…I enjoyed the ‘girl” things about cosmetics and fashion. Otherwise, I like sports, motorcycles and martial arts. I can share more information about me if you go to my blog at https://annwill.wordpress.com and I wish you much success! Good luck with the class.

kim74 said 2 months ago:

We definitely have a few things in common. I am a girly girl as well. Shopping is definitely on the top of my list of things to do. Not only do you get to go out and look at all of the new clothes, make-up, shoes (by far my favorite), but you get to go out and spend time with your girlfriends. Spending time with them has always allowed me to get my life into perspective. Good luck to you in this class. I look forward to your future blogs.

Advertisements

Entry Filed under: Uncategorized

One Comment Add your own


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to comments via RSS Feed

Pages

Categories

Calendar

November 2008
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Most Recent Posts

 
%d bloggers like this: